Featured

Compliance Clips for December 2020

CONSUMER REPORTING

50 Years of the FCRA
The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)—the nation’s first consumer financial privacy statute—is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The FCRA was designed to regulate the practices of consumer reporting agencies (CRAs) that collect and process information into reports used by businesses to make informed financial or employment decisions about consumers. Since 1970, the law has been an immense benefit to consumers, and will continue to ensure covered entities honor their legal obligations. Likewise, it will also require ongoing review to address the evolving economic landscape.
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A Friendly Reminder about FCRA Requirements
As you’re well aware, when an employer uses a third party (like A-Check) to conduct background checks, there are FCRA compliance requirements that must be followed. For your convenience, here’s a very quick checklist of key requirements:

  • Ensure there is a permissible purpose for performing a background check on an applicant/employee, based on their role and responsibilities.
  • Provide clear written notice in a stand-alone document to the applicant/employee that a background check will be conducted, and the resulting information will be used to make an employment decision.
  • Obtain the applicant/employee’s written consent to perform a background check and/or investigative report.
  • If the background check information results in an adverse action decision, a notice of pre-adverse action, along with a copy of the background check results and a copy of the Summary of Your Rights Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, must be presented to the individual.
  • Allow the individual at least five business days to dispute the information in the background check
  • Upon a final decision, and if adverse action is taken, provide the individual with a final notice of adverse action.

We’re focused on helping you remain compliant, and always welcome your questions.

The California Privacy Rights Act
The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA), a ballot initiative approved by California voters, amends the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) to create additional consumer rights and create a new category of consumer personal information. Never before has a state gone so far to protect consumer data privacy. Before the CPRA takes effect on Jan. 1, 2023, we expect to see another lengthy process of proposing, commenting on, and finalizing CPRA regulations, which the CPRA requires to be promulgated by July 1, 2022. Here’s a closer look.
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I-9 AND E-VERIFY

Further Extension: Form I-9 Requirements in response to COVID-19
The in-person requirement for the Form I-9 is temporarily suspended if your company is closed or taking other precautions due to COVID-19. The general rule is that an employer must undertake a physical inspection of the document(s) presented by the employee for section 2 purposes.

UPDATE: Because of ongoing COVID-19 precautions, remote I-9 document review has been extended; the expiration date for these accommodations is now December 31, 2020.

The government has suspended the in-person and physical inspection of the document(s) presented by the employee when completing the Form I-9. During this time, an employer can view the document(s) presented by the employee via Zoom or Skype, for example.
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Recent E-Verify Requirement Update
The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced a new timing requirement for employers that receive a Tentative Nonconfirmation (TNC) during the E-Verify case creation process. E-Verify now requires enrolled employers to take action on Tentative Nonconfirmations (TNC) for their employees within 10 federal government working days or risk potential compliance actions, up to and including termination of their E-Verify account.
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SUBSTANCE ABUSE TESTING

New York
In news we’re watching: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has said legalizing marijuana could represent a key opportunity for the state to recover economically from the coronavirus pandemic. Cannabis has been decriminalized in New York since 2019, but recreational marijuana remains illegal in the state. The hope is to have something introduced to address this in early 2021.
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Ballot Measures Passed in November
Cannabis legalization was on many state ballots in November, and of the states that voted on cannabis, all approved legal recreational marijuana for adults age 21 and older. New Jersey and Montana approved recreational cannabis, Mississippi approved medical use, while South Dakota approved both recreational and medical use at one time.
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Oregon
In yet more recent ballot news, Oregon has become the first state to decriminalize personal possession of small amount of illegal hard drugs, including cocaine, heroin, oxycodone, and methamphetamine. The ballot measure reclassified possession of small amounts of a list of hard drugs as a Class E civil violation, similar to a traffic offense.
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AS A REMINDER: At A-Check, we’re happy to help implement a drug screening program that meets your evolving needs—or make adjustments to the program you’re already running with us. Just give us a call at 877-345-2021 and ask to speak with someone on your Client Relations team.

BAN THE BOX

Montgomery County, Maryland
The Montgomery County, Maryland Council approved amendments to its 2014 Ban the Box legislation. Original legislation prohibited employers with 15 or more full-time employees in Montgomery County from conducting a criminal background check of a job applicant, or otherwise inquiring about the criminal or arrest history of an applicant, prior to the completion of a first interview. Bill 35-20 expands previous legislation by prohibiting background checks until after extending a conditional job offer, and redefining “employer” to include any employer with one or more full-time employees in Montgomery County.
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COVID-19

Return-to-Office COVID-19 Testing Services for Your Workforce
Depending on your company’s policy, requiring employees to test negative for COVID-19 prior to an office return may be a viable complement to office cleaning and sanitation practices you may already have in place. We want to quickly let you know that A-Check is here to help by providing solutions to meet your immediate needs. Testing and surveillance services through A-Check’s partner network of Concentra Medical Centers can help as your employees return to the office.
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Questions? We’re here to help!

Featured

Your Safety Comes First: Return-to-Office COVID-19 Testing Services for Your Workforce

As a growing number of employees are carefully transitioning back to their physical workplaces, employers are focused not only on maintaining safe, healthy offices, but also on implementing COVID-19 testing as a critical element of their return-to-office efforts. Depending on your company’s policy, requiring employees to test negative for COVID-19 prior to an office return may be a viable complement to office cleaning and sanitation practices you may already have in place.

We want to quickly let you know that A-Check is here to help by providing solutions to meet your immediate needs. Testing and surveillance services through A-Check’s partner network of Concentra Medical Centers can help as your employees return to the office.

We offer initial screening using a COVID-19 Assessment. A clinician reviews your employee’s responses to determine if the employee may go to the office or if testing for active COVID-19 infection, testing for COVID-19 antibodies, or an in-person clinical examination is recommended.

  • COVID-19 Antibody Test – Initial: includes comprehensive screening and tests employees for possible COVID-19 immunity
  • COVID-19 RNA Test – Initial: includes comprehensive screening and tests employees for active COVID-19 infection
  • COVID-19 RNA Test – Surveillance: includes ongoing screening and testing of employees for active COVID-19 infection

Employees’ COVID-19 status will be assessed by experienced clinicians who apply their medical knowledge and experience to evaluate the risk of each individual employee and the risk to the workforce. You have the added assurance that services will be delivered consistently from more than 520 Concentra medical centers. Of course, we also strongly encourage employers to follow CDC recommendations at the workplace including social distancing, wearing face coverings or masks, handwashing, and covering coughs and sneezes.

Please don’t hesitate to reach out to us for more information. We are committed to the health and safety of our valued clients.

Featured

The 2020 November Election Was a Big Day . . . for Marijuana.

While Americans across the country were glued to their TVs throughout the day, it’s noteworthy to mention that aside from the Presidential election, it was a big day in America for the legalization of marijuana. In fact, voters in five states approved new measures to legalize medical or recreational marijuana. Here’s a quick rundown of ballot measures that passed:

Arizona
While an earlier legalization measure failed in 2016, voters this time around passed Prop 207—the Smart and Safe Arizona Act (SSAA). This new legislation will permit possession (up to one ounce) and use of marijuana for adults ages 21+, and will permit individuals to grow up to six marijuana plants in their primary residence.

Mississippi
Nearly 70% of voters supported Mississippi Ballot Measure 1, legislation permitting doctors within the state to prescribe medical marijuana for patients with at least one of nearly two dozen qualifying conditions such as cancer, PTSD, HIV, and many more.

Montana
Voters passed Initiative 190 and Initiative 118, which together legalize the consumption, possession, and purchase of marijuana for adults ages 21+. This legislation also provides an opportunity for people serving marijuana-related sentences—which are no longer considered crimes under these Initiatives—to request resentencing or that their convictions be expunged.

New Jersey
A majority of New Jersey voters supported legalization, by a roughly 2-to-1 margin, to pass Public Question No. 1. This legislation will legalize the use and possession of marijuana for adults ages 21+, and will also legalize the cultivation, processing, and sale of marijuana. Keep an eye out for neighboring states to consider and introduce future legislation measures to capitalize on this area’s tax revenue potential.

South Dakota
Voters overwhelmingly passed Constitutional Amendment A and Measure 26, making it the first state to legalize marijuana for both recreational and medical use on the same ballot. Legislation legalizes recreational marijuana use, possession, and distribution of up to one ounce for adults ages 21+. Additionally, this allows for a medical marijuana program to support patients with a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition.

Oregon
Additionally, it’s worth reporting that Oregon voters passed Measure 110, which decriminalizes possession of small amounts of drugs such as heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine—making them no longer punishable by jail time, but instead amounting to something along the lines of a traffic ticket. It also evolves addiction assistance and health services, offering critical help instead of a jail sentence.

Please keep in mind that in spite of evolving legislation, employers still have a right to maintain a drug-free workplace and/or maintain workplace policies that address drug and alcohol use among employees or applicants. We’re happy to answer any substance abuse screening questions you may have, help you implement a drug screening program that meets your evolving needs, or make adjustments to the program you’re already running with us.

Featured

Compliance Clips for November 2020

EMPLOYMENT LAW

2020 Headlines
While Halloween is now officially behind us, it’s still worth a quick look at 2020 headlines that are sure to give HR professionals—and the rest of us—nightmares! Steer clear of lawsuits by managing with care and attention to employment law.
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I-9 AND E-VERIFY

Extension Still Applies: Form I-9 Requirements in response to COVID-19
The in-person requirement for the Form I-9 is temporarily suspended if your company is closed or taking other precautions due to COVID-19. 
The general rule is that an employer must undertake a physical inspection of the document(s) presented by the employee for section 2 purposes.

UPDATE: Because of ongoing COVID-19 precautions, remote I-9 document review has been extended; the expiration date for these accommodations is now November 19, 2020.

The government has suspended the in-person and physical inspection of the document(s) presented by the employee when completing the Form I-9. During this time, an employer can view the document(s) presented by the employee via Zoom or Skype, for example.
READ MORE

Exploring the Basics of Form I-9
With U.S. government focus on enforcement and audit of employee authorization to work, it’s always worth taking a few moments to review the basics of Form I-9. Every employer must have a Form I-9 for every employee. While the form itself is not complicated, accuracy and process counts to ensure that you’re prepared for an audit.
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SUBSTANCE ABUSE TESTING

Substance Abuse Trends Reported by Quest Diagnostics
U.S. General Workforce drug positivity hits 16-Year High in 2019. Quest Diagnostics—a trusted A-Check drug screening partner and leading provider of diagnostic services—recently released their Drug Testing Index™ analysis of more than nine million workplace drug test results. As Quest Diagnostics reports, even prior to COVID-19, workplace drug positivity rates were trending in the wrong direction. Now, with many Americans under higher stress levels as they continue to juggle remote work schedules, childcare and homeschool responsibilities, and even frustration from ongoing social isolation, it stands to reason that there may have been negative impact on general health and well-being during these recent months.
READ MORE

AS A REMINDER: At A-Check, we’re happy to help implement a drug screening program that meets your evolving needs—or make adjustments to the program you’re already running with us. Just give us a call at 877-345-2021 and ask to speak with someone on your Client Relations team.

BAN THE BOX AND CRIMINAL HISTORY DISCLOSURE

Hawaii
Now effective, Hawaii has amended its Ban the Box law, offering protections for individuals with old and/or relatively minor conviction records. The law prevents most private sector employers from considering felony convictions older than seven years, and misdemeanor convictions older than five years. However, an employer making employment decisions may inquire about and consider an individual’s criminal conviction record, provided the conviction in question has a logical relationship to the position’s duties.
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South Carolina
In other Ban the Box news, the city of North Augusta, SC, is removing a question about criminal history from job applications for city positions. This change won’t alter the hiring process at all; it will simply remove the question from upcoming applications.
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A Ban the Box Overview
36 states and 150+ municipalities have Ban the Box laws to prohibit employers from asking about criminal history on job applications. This article quickly details a number of the most recent changes and updates in Hawaii, California, and St. Louis, Missouri.
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SALARY HISTORY

Maryland
Now effective as of October 1, 2020, there are more boxes to ban from Maryland employment applications. Maryland prohibits employers from asking about an applicant’s current or prior pay. This new law will 1) prohibit employers from requesting or relying on job applicants’ prior pay history to make decisions about employment or initial pay in most circumstances; and 2) require an employer to provide an applicant, upon request, with the wage range for the job applied for. The new law amends Maryland’s existing Equal Pay for Equal Work (EWEW) law, and will apply to all private, state, and local government employers in Maryland.
READ MORE

A Look at Salary History Bans Already in Place
State and local governments are increasingly adopting legislation to prohibit employers from requesting salary history from job applicants. For your reference, here’s a great running list of states and localities that have legislation in place.
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COVID-19

Updated COVID-19 Guidance from the EEOC
While we mentioned this in last month’s email, it’s worth repeating, especially as many organizations continue to make cautious, careful decisions about the balance between remote and in-office workforces.

The EEOC recently updated guidance on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Coronavirus pandemic. This new information expands their prior guidance on how the ADA applies to the current pandemic. In a question and answer form, this guidance covers a number of important issues surrounding COVID-19 and the workplace, including: the right for an employer to ask employees entering the office if they have COVID-19 symptoms, the right for an employer to report employees with COVID-19 or associated symptoms to appropriate personnel, the right for an employer to require a temperature check, and much more.
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Questions? We’re here to help!

Featured

Compliance Clips for October 2020

CONSUMER REPORTING

Helpful Compliance Guidance for End Users of Consumer Reports
You may already know that the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) is the primary legislation regulating the procurement and use of a consumer report (a background screening report from A-Check Global, for example). Adding even more complexity to compliance focus—regulatory compliance for domestic consumer reporting also includes state and jurisdiction consumer reporting laws with additional procedures and disclosures. This topic can become very confusing, very quickly. Please know we’re always here to help. A-Check developed a handy checklist to help you gauge your organization’s current level of regulatory compliance for the end use of consumer reports in the hiring process.
READ MORE

I-9 AND E-VERIFY

Extension: Form I-9 and Requirements in response to COVID-19
An additional update is available in light of ongoing COVID-19 efforts. The in-person requirement for the Form I-9 is temporarily suspended if your company is closed or taking other precautions due to COVID-19. The general rule is that an employer must undertake a physical inspection of the document(s) presented by the employee for section 2 purposes.

UPDATE: Because of ongoing COVID-19 precautions, it has been announced that remote I-9 document review has been extended for another 60 days; the expiration date for these accommodations is now November 19, 2020.

The government has suspended the in-person and physical inspection of the document(s) presented by the employee when completing the Form I-9. During this time, an employer can view the document(s) presented by the employee via Zoom or Skype, for example.
READ MORE

Florida
The Florida Governor signed a new E-Verify law. Beginning January 1, 2021, Florida public employers, private contractors, and subcontractors, must register with and use E-Verify to confirm work eligibility of new hires.
READ MORE

SUBSTANCE ABUSE TESTING

Arizona
A measure to legalize marijuana in Arizona officially qualified for the November General Election ballot as Prop. 207. Under the measure, adults could possess up to an ounce of marijuana at a time and cultivate up to six plants for personal use. The initiative also contains several restorative justice provisions such as allowing individuals with prior marijuana convictions to petition the courts for expungement. We’ll keep an eye on this one and report back to you after the elections.
READ MORE

Substance Abuse Trends Reported by Quest Diagnostics
U.S. General Workforce drug positivity hits 16-Year High in 2019. Quest Diagnostics—a trusted A-Check drug screening partner and leading provider of diagnostic services—recently released their Drug Testing Index™ analysis of more than nine million workplace drug test results. As Quest Diagnostics reports, even prior to COVID-19, workplace drug positivity rates were trending in the wrong direction. Now, with many Americans under higher stress levels as they continue to juggle remote work schedules, childcare and homeschool responsibilities, and even frustration from ongoing social isolation, it stands to reason that there may have been negative impact on general health and well-being during these recent months.
READ MORE

AS A REMINDER: At A-Check, we’re happy to help implement a drug screening program that meets your evolving needs—or make adjustments to the program you’re already running with us. Just give us a call at 877-345-2021 and ask to speak with someone on your Client Relations team.

BAN THE BOX AND CRIMINAL HISTORY DISCLOSURE

Hawaii
Effective September 15, 2020, Hawaii amends its Ban the Box law to fortify protections for individuals with old and/or relatively minor conviction records. The law prevents most private sector employers from considering felony convictions older than seven years, and misdemeanor convictions older than five years. However, an employer making employment decisions may inquire about and consider an individual’s criminal conviction record, provided the conviction in question has a logical relationship to the position’s duties.
READ MORE

North Carolina
State jobs will be more open to people with criminal records, due to a new executive order signed by Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper. Starting in November, 2020, the state will no longer ask prospective job applicants to check a box saying whether they have a criminal record. This law will apply only to state government jobs, not private companies or local governments. The elimination of that question on job applications has been a longtime goal of Ban the Box supporters in North Carolina.
READ MORE

SALARY HISTORY

Maryland
Maryland prohibits employers from relying on job applicants’ prior pay. The new salary history ban and wage range notice requirement takes effect October 1, 2020. This new law will 1) prohibit employers from requesting or relying on job applicants’ prior pay history to make decisions about employment or initial pay in most circumstances; and 2) require an employer to provide an applicant, upon request, with the wage range for the job applied for. The new law amends Maryland’s existing Equal Pay for Equal Work (EWEW) law, and will apply to all private, state, and local government employers in Maryland.
READ MORE

A Look at Salary History Bans Already in Place
State and local governments are increasingly adopting legislation to prohibit employers from requesting salary history from job applicants. For your reference, here’s a great running list of states and localities that have legislation in place.
READ MORE

COVID-19

Updated COVID-19 Guidance from the EEOC
The EEOC recently updated guidance on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Coronavirus pandemic. This new information expands their prior guidance on how the ADA applies to the current pandemic. In a question and answer form, this guidance covers a number of important issues surrounding COVID-19 and the workplace, including: the right for an employer to ask employees entering the office if they have COVID-19 symptoms, the right for an employer to report employees with COVID-19 or associated symptoms to appropriate personnel, the right for an employer to require a temperature check, and much more.
READ MORE

Questions? We’re here to help!