Happy Applicant, Happy Company

happy applicant

Here at A-Check Global, we know that finding a qualified applicant to fill a specific position is so much more than just an accurate, comprehensive background screen. Filling a seat can be a lengthy and time-consuming process. From job board posting or working with a staffing agency, to holding interviews and selecting the most-qualified applicant for an offer letter . . . the whole process can easily take weeks. Then there’s the time involved requesting and completing a background screen.

It’s because of these demands on your time that we do everything in our power to help make the lives of HR professionals just a little easier. Many of our clients use A-Check’s web-based applicant portal that efficiently shifts the data entry portion of background and drug screening request from the requestor (usually your HR Department) to the applicant. This expedites the hiring process because keyboarding errors and duplicative data entry can be minimized. The result is a seamless workflow affording the applicant more control through the screening process, ultimately leading to faster processing times and greater satisfaction for both the applicant and company.

How we do it

With A-Check Global’s mobile friendly, secure portal, applicants can conveniently submit information online, upload supporting documentation, self-schedule drug screens (as applicable), sign documents electronically, and request electronic copies of their completed background screen reports.

Providing this level of convenience to your applicants while keeping them updated throughout the background screening process means they stay engaged with your company and are less likely to look elsewhere for employment . . . a win-win for everyone involved!

A-Check Global understands how important it is to delight both you and your applicants when partnering with us. This is why we’re driven to provide the best employment screening experience possible. Contact us today to learn more, and to request a demo of our online systems. We’d welcome the opportunity.


International Screening Solutions

Global Reach

Because talent knows no borders

Recruiting from an international talent pool offers near-limitless opportunity for employers, but can also present unique challenges when performing background screens. An effective global risk mitigation strategy requires expertise from trained professionals tasked with researching and analyzing the vast quantities of data available worldwide.

We at A-Check Global provide our clients with professional screening services around the globe. Utilizing our professional in-house staff and our International Affiliate Network, we provide employment and education verification, drug screening, and international criminal records in more than 200 countries and territories world-wide. And, our international services are handled with the same care and attention to customer service that we provide for domestic services.

International Criminal Records Research

International criminal records searches are conducted both in-house and through our international research partner network. This network of professional researchers is comprised of established professionals with a proven record of expertise in their countries’ investigative and reporting processes. They are fully vetted, and monitored for accuracy and quality of service regularly.

International criminal records research is reported in real time through A-Check Global’s proprietary systems. Our research partners receive service requests and return completed investigations as well as supporting documentation through our secure portal, ensuring our clients receive results in a timely manner. Records are reviewed by our Quality Control and Compliance Department prior to release to clients to ensure we meet the regulations of the applicant’s home country as well as any client specific policies.

International Verifications

International verifications are conducted by our in-house team of professional verifiers. Our verifications specialists are available 24/5 to ensure work schedules align with all time zones. Utilizing an in-house group of verification professionals ensures international and domestic clients requesting background screening data receive the same level of dedication and attention to detail they enjoy from our US based services.

We maintain detailed turnaround time information for our employment, education, and professional reference verification services across the globe.


Background Screening and the Education Community


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As one might guess, business rules that help guide employment decisions can differ based on the needs of the organization or industry. The education community is a great example, especially because faculty or other employees may be in contact with children or young adults. Likewise, schools are largely dependent on their reputations as an organization and on the integrity of those working on campus. These higher standards often result in greater, mandatory background screening requirements for the education community.

Here’s a small sample of state-specific background screening legislation:

For example, in Florida, Senate Bill 988 requires specific notations on the driver’s licenses of sexual predators, and establishes stringent standards for background screening of individuals providing contracted non-instructional services to Florida public schools or districts. Additionally, Senate Bill 1712 establishes that a conviction of certain offenses makes one ineligible for a Florida Educator Certificate, and additionally, instructional personnel and school administrators are ineligible for employment in any position that requires direct student contact in a district school system, charter school, private school that accepts students under the Corporate Tax or McKay Scholarships, or the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind.

Pennsylvania School Law requires that all applicants for employment in public and private schools, employees of independent contractors seeking business with public and private schools, and student teacher candidates undergo background checks if they will have direct contact with students. School volunteers who are responsible for children’s welfare or who have “direct volunteer contact” with children at a school are also required to have background checks.

Of course, these aren’t the only states requiring mandatory background screening for those working with children, but are used to illustrate that if you’re planning a career in education, be prepared to submit to background screening for each position you hold.

If you have questions about the background screening process, A-Check Global’s team of dedicated professionals are available to help, and can provide friendly, accurate guidance. Give us a call today at 877-345-2021, or email support@acheckglobal.com.





Employer (End User) Responsibility during Background Screening

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When an employer uses an applicant’s background information to make informed employment decisions, they must do so in compliance with a number of federal and regulatory laws in place to protect applicants from any type of discrimination. The “End User” legal responsibilities include:

  1. Establishing Permissible Purpose
  2. Disclosure and Authorization
  3. Evaluation; and
  4. Adverse Action Notification

Let’s take a deeper look at End User responsibilities based on Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) guidelines.

Permissible Purpose

According to the FCRA, the End User must have a legal permissible purpose for requesting a background screen report. End Users requesting background checks from A-Check Global do so under the legal permissible purpose of employment. The permissible purpose of employment maintains slightly different rules from other consumer report permissible purposes. Of these rules, the End User’s responsibility of Disclosure and Authorization is one of the most crucial requiring compliance.

Disclosure and Authorization

The End User must properly disclose that they will conduct a background screen—and subsequently will receive a background information report—in a document consisting solely of the Disclosure. Following this disclosure, the next required step is to obtain authorization from the applicant prior to processing their background screen. It is the End User’s responsibility to manage the forms they provide to applicants. These forms are often referred to as Disclosure and/or Authorization forms and provide the applicant with details pertaining to permissible purpose for conducting the background investigation, and their rights throughout the process. Disclosure and Authorization forms can typically be signed physically or electronically. However, your company or organization should always consult with your legal team to confirm you are utilizing the appropriate forms, and, if you are utilizing an electronic signature option, to ensure your system complies with the E-SIGN Act of 1999 and UETA requirements. For additional information about this responsibility, you may contact A-Check Global and we will provide information on utilizing A-Check Global’s pre-prepared forms. After disclosure and authorization, End Users must focus on evaluation.


Evaluating background screening results is the responsibility of each hiring company or organization. Your background screening agency is legally unable to evaluate the background screen and make hiring decisions. While agencies may adjudicate reports based on a pre-defined matrix supplied by the End User, the End User must review and evaluate each report, prior to making a hiring decision, in order to maintain compliance.

The EEOC states that End Users perform the following steps when utilizing background information in making a hiring decision:

  • Apply the same standards to everyone, regardless of their race, national origin, color, sex, religion, disability, genetic information (including family medical history), or age.
  • Take special care when basing employment decisions on background problems that may be more common among people of a protected class.
  • Be prepared to make exceptions for problems revealed during a background check that were caused by a disability.

In the event that an evaluation yields a negative result, employers must participate in the adverse action process.

Adverse Action

Whenever Adverse Action is taken based on background screening results, the End User must notify the candidate. For instance, if you do not hire an individual based on criminal records located during the background screening process, you must supply the candidate with a pre-adverse notification followed by a final adverse notification.

The pre-adverse notification will afford the candidate the opportunity to dispute the findings on their report. It should provide details about the agency that completed the report, including the contact information to be used should the candidate wish to file a dispute. The Final Adverse Notification should be sent within a reasonable timeframe after the pre-adverse notification. While there is no time frame specified by the FCRA, A-Check Global best practices suggest waiting at least five days before sending the final notification and continuing to hold the job open in any case where the applicant files a dispute.

Regulatory compliance plays a major role in the background screening process. There are many potential risks and liabilities associated with utilizing reports, and it is in your company or organization’s best interest to follow best practices, guidelines and regulations outlined by the FCRA and EEOC. As the End User of a consumer or investigative background screen report, you have a number of responsibilities and should remain proactive in maintaining an understanding of these responsibilities, at all times. And as always, if you have any questions you may contact us at 877-345-2021 or clientsupport@acheckglobal.com.


A Fair Chance for Applicants – the Rise of Ban the Box Legislation


Welcome to the third blog in our CRAsh Course on consumer reporting. In this article, we continue to focus on changes implemented since the Great Recession by looking deeper into Ban the Box laws—fair hiring practices that put a candidate’s qualifications first by removing questions about criminal history.

A Fair Chance for Applicants – the Rise of Ban the Box Legislation

In our last article  we discussed how the Great Recession drove lawmakers to place limits on the use of credit reports in consumer reporting. This time, we look into Ban the Box laws which also gained popularity toward the end of the economic crisis.

Prior to the Great Recession, Hawaii was the only state with Ban the Box legislation in place. Since 2009, twenty-eight additional states have enacted some form of statewide Ban the Box policy. In states without Ban the Box laws, cities and counties have enacted their own regulations.

During the crisis, high rates of unemployment led to increased competition between applicants. As a result, many people admitting to a criminal record on their application were immediately disregarded without any consideration for previous work history, or received no thoughtful analysis of how their criminal record affected their ability to perform job duties.

To combat this, Ban the Box regulations were designed to give people with a criminal record a better chance at gaining employment. By forcing employers to wait until an interview has taken place, or until a job offer has been made, proponents of these laws believe people with convictions have a better shot at getting a job.

Recently, the effectiveness of these laws has come into question; however, states continue to enact legislation banning employers from asking for conviction history during the application process. In 2017 alone, Indiana, Kentucky, Nevada, Pennsylvania and Utah had laws “banning the box” go into effect.

Employee rights organizations, like the National Employment Law Project (NELP), also feature Ban the Box laws prominently in their platforms. Support for the laws appears alongside topics covered extensively by the media, such as the $15 minimum wage movement, and furthering rights for “gig” workers like Uber drivers.

Remaining Compliant and Best Practices

The patchwork rollout of Ban the Box regulations can make compliance with these laws daunting. 29 states and 150 municipalities have enacted Ban the Box regulations for at least some employees. Nine states have Ban the Box laws in place for all employees. There is currently no federal law affecting private companies. This makes creating nationwide best practices difficult.

It is important for employers to know the laws of their jurisdiction, or the jurisdictions where they have hiring locations. This list, completed by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), has information on all states and municipalities with Ban the Box laws in effect. It can help you determine if your company is in a jurisdiction with a Ban the Box law.

As the laws vary, often times even from city to city, even smaller businesses with only a few offices could have different requirements from one location to the next. To simplify their processes, many companies like Walmart, Target and Home Depot, have enacted companywide Ban the Box policies. You may wish to go this route as well.

Estimates show that nearly two-thirds of employees live in an area with a Ban the Box policy in place, so it’s likely you’re already working in a jurisdiction with Ban the Box legislation. To ensure compliance, your application and hiring processes should be reviewed by a legal or HR professional. It’s also a good idea to periodically review your policies against current law and make updates when needed.

If you are not in a jurisdiction with Ban the Box laws in place, best practice is to remain updated on potential regulations that could go into effect. Subscribing to Human Resource oriented blogs and Google Alerts related to Ban the Box can be a simple, inexpensive way to stay informed.

Contracting with a background screening company committed to compliance—like A-Check Global—can also help you remain compliant with these laws. As many background screening companies host the application or applicant consent process for their clients, they are also often responsible for complying with Ban the Box.

For more information about this topic, or to discuss information on consumer reporting, feel free to contact us at connect@acheckglobal.com.